Jean Kabre and The Transformation of His Home Village in Burkina Faso, Africa : Nyhetsfoto

Jean Kabre and The Transformation of His Home Village in Burkina Faso, Africa

Upphovsman: 
The Washington Post / Medarbetare
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 13: Jean Kabre, R, talks with co-workers Justine Osborne, L, and Daniel Ezoua, C, where Kabre works as a concierge and event planner at 101 Constitution Avenue on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, in Washington, DC. Kabre is the charismatic, always-smiling guy who has befriended the entire building. So much so that, as people watched him drain his paycheck every week to keep dozens of relatives in Burkina Faso from starving, they decided to pitch in. Starting with a pump to replace the village's muddy drinking-water hole, they now have an ambitious plan to feed, house, educate and equip the people of Tintilou to start their own business grinding grain. At a time when many established charities have massive operations and overhead expenses, and in a city where the desire to help often gets mired in politics and bureaucracy, the ability to give directly to a friend just felt more natural than sending off another check. (Photo by Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Bildtext:
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 13: Jean Kabre, R, talks with co-workers Justine Osborne, L, and Daniel Ezoua, C, where Kabre works as a concierge and event planner at 101 Constitution Avenue on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, in Washington, DC. Kabre is the charismatic, always-smiling guy who has befriended the entire building. So much so that, as people watched him drain his paycheck every week to keep dozens of relatives in Burkina Faso from starving, they decided to pitch in. Starting with a pump to replace the village's muddy drinking-water hole, they now have an ambitious plan to feed, house, educate and equip the people of Tintilou to start their own business grinding grain. At a time when many established charities have massive operations and overhead expenses, and in a city where the desire to help often gets mired in politics and bureaucracy, the ability to give directly to a friend just felt more natural than sending off another check. (Photo by Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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Datum skapat:
13 november 2012
Redaktionell fil nr:
157046976
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Saknar release.Mer information
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Samling:
The Washington Post
Upphovsman:
The Washington Post/Getty Images
Högsta tillåtna filstorlek:
5 500 x 3 667 bpkt (69,85 x 46,57 cm) - 200 dpi - 10 MB
Källa:
The Washington Post
Objektnamn:
ME-VILLAGE

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Jean Kabre R talks with coworkers Justine Osborne L and Daniel Ezoua... Nyhetsfoto 157046976Arbeta,Evenemang,Horisontell,Hotellconcierge,Jobbarkompis,Mänskligt intresse,Planeringskalender,Prata,USA,Washington DCPhotographer Collection: The Washington Post 2012 The Washington PostWASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 13: Jean Kabre, R, talks with co-workers Justine Osborne, L, and Daniel Ezoua, C, where Kabre works as a concierge and event planner at 101 Constitution Avenue on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, in Washington, DC. Kabre is the charismatic, always-smiling guy who has befriended the entire building. So much so that, as people watched him drain his paycheck every week to keep dozens of relatives in Burkina Faso from starving, they decided to pitch in. Starting with a pump to replace the village's muddy drinking-water hole, they now have an ambitious plan to feed, house, educate and equip the people of Tintilou to start their own business grinding grain. At a time when many established charities have massive operations and overhead expenses, and in a city where the desire to help often gets mired in politics and bureaucracy, the ability to give directly to a friend just felt more natural than sending off another check. (Photo by Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images)